Occupational stress and burnout western society

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Occupational stress and burnout western society

Henderson Find articles by Demetria F. Received Mar 9; Accepted Apr This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution CC-BY license http: This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.

Abstract Occupational stress is a known health risk for a range of psychological, behavioral, and medical disorders and diseases. Organizations and individuals can mitigate these disorders through preventive stress management and enhanced wellbeing.

This article addresses, first, the known health risk evidence related to occupational stress; second, the use of preventive stress management in organizations as the framework for intervention; and third, the emerging domain of enhancing wellbeing, which strengthens the individual.

Premature death and disability along with chronic suffering from occupational stress are not inevitable, despite being known outcome risks. Introduction Stress is a rubric for the causes demands or stressorsconsequences distress and eustressand modifiers of the psychophysiological phenomenon known as the stress response.

Selye [ 2 ] demonstrated how stress is a risk factor for a range of health disorders and diseases, which he labeled diseases of maladaptation. Quick and Quick [ 3 ] brought the public health notions of prevention into an organizational stress context, forging the theory of preventive stress management.

Occupational stress was identified during the s as one of the top ten occupational health problems in the United States and likely throughout the Western industrialized nations.

Occupational stress and burnout western society

Sauter, Murphy, and Hurrell [ 4 ] began developing a prevention agenda for addressing what some called an epidemic of stress. Stress is directly linked to seven of the ten leading causes of death in the world, with cardiovascular disease being the leading cause for both men and women [ 5 ].

Occupational and organizational stress is a key cardiovascular risk factor [ 6 ]. Despite the fact that occupational stress is a known risk factor for health disorders, a positive side of the issue is found in notions from public health and preventive medicine.

Our purpose is to briefly review the known health risk evidence regarding occupational stress, then incorporate enhancing wellbeing and positive psychology with the known theory of preventive stress management.

We achieve this purpose through three major topics of the article. The first topic briefly reviews the known health risk evidence related to occupational stress, covered in Section 1Section 2Section 3Section 4Section 5Section 6 and Section 7.

The second topic presents preventive stress management in organizations as the framework for intervention, covered in Section 8Section 9Section 10 and Section The third topic extends the prevention framework with the emerging domain of enhancing wellbeing and positive psychology, covered in Section Premature death and disability along with chronic suffering from occupational stress are not inevitable despite being known outcome risks.

Occupational and Organizational Stress To call occupational stress a risk factor requires consideration of the life history of the problem. Occupational stress is not an acute or toxic condition that can be cured through treatment. Rather, it is a chronic condition that requires an understanding of the epidemiology or life history of the problem prior to exploring protection, prevention, and intervention alternatives.

The epidemiology of occupational stress may be considered in three stages: Stage 1 includes the causes of stress, which are known to be risk factors. Stage 2 is the stress response, a normal and naturally occurring reaction to environmental demands or internal pressures.

Stage 3 includes the consequences of the life history—either forms of distress medical, psychological, behavioral or forms of eustress healthy stress. In addition to the main stem of the life history of occupational stress, the stress response manifests a number of individual difference modifiers, which may either serve as protection factors for the individual or further open vulnerability.

This is sometimes called the weak organ hypothesis. Demands and Stressors A broad set of occupational and work demands as well as environmental stressors can trigger the stress response. While pressures may vary, some occupational stress concerns span occupations.

Work-family conflict is one of those overarching risks, as demands from the home and for personal space tumble into the workplace.

Hammer and her colleagues [ 7 ] addressed both the family-to-work and work-to-family conflicts. Cooper and Payne [ 10 ] charted one of the original overviews for understanding stress at work by attending to epidemiology of work stress, both blue-collar and white-collar stressors, and the family as a cause of stress.

Occupational stress amongst audiologists: Compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue, and burnout The sample consisted of members of the New Zealand Audiological Society. Apr 29,  · Occupational stress is a known health risk for a range of psychological, behavioral, and medical disorders and diseases. Organizations and individuals can mitigate these disorders through preventive stress management and enhanced wellbeing. . If you have access to journal via a society or associations, read the instructions below. Access to society journal content varies across our titles. If you have access to a journal via a society or association membership, please browse to your society journal, select an article to view, and follow the instructions in this box.

Quick, Quick, Nelson, and Hurrell [ 11 ] provided an exhaustive review of the research literature and identified four broad categories of workplace demands—task demands occupation, careers, workload, job insecurity ; role demands role conflict and ambiguity ; physical demands temperature, lighting, workplace design ; and interpersonal demands social density, personality conflicts, leadership style, group pressures.

When examining the causes of occupational stress, three sets of demands command our attention—occupational and work, home-based or family, and individual generated or internally imposed. The lack of employee decision latitude [ 12 ] is especially problematic in high-strain jobs, that is, high work demands and low control [ 13 ].

The second leading cause is uncertainty about any number of workplace aspects. The third leading cause of stress is poorly managed conflict at work [ 15 ].

Not all conflict is bad, of course; conflict that resolves issues is both constructive and functional.

Burnout and the Brain – Association for Psychological Science

He determined that perception and emotion trigger the release of catecholamines by the adrenal glands, primarily epinephrine and norepinephrine.| P a g e RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN OCCUPATIONAL STRESS AND BURNOUT AMONG SCHOOL TEACHERS Neelam Kumari, Anup Sood Department . Occupational stress is common issue in modern society.

This kind of stress related the work. In general, job stress often happen in some situations which are unequal between the level of personal skills and the requirement of workload. Apr 29,  · Occupational stress is a known health risk for a range of psychological, behavioral, and medical disorders and diseases.

Organizations and individuals can mitigate these disorders through preventive stress management and enhanced wellbeing. . Stress and Burnout There is a lot to be said about occupational stress, burnout and work satisfaction. However, finding the ideal career field can be a challenging task all by itself, and even more difficult with the pressures of financial hardships.

The prevalence and effects of occupational stress, burnout and low job satisfaction are poorly understood in the health workforce.

Occupational stress and burnout western society

This article gives a brief overview of occupational stress, burnout and job satisfaction among health professionals, and examines whether engagement in research can contribute to job satisfaction and efficacy, and thereby to reducing stress and burnout.

For the purpose of preventing occupational burnout, various stress management interventions have been shown to help improve employee health and well-being in the workplace and lower stress levels. intent of maintaining and improving employees' working ability and ensuring a supply of skilled and capable labor in society.

Additional.

Occupational Stress: Preventing Suffering, Enhancing Wellbeing †